VemoHerb VeganPro

37.90 

Description

100% natural
Unique vegan protein made only from plant sources
Amino acid profile comparable to whey
24 g of pure concentrated protein in every dose
Integrated BCAAs and L-glutamine
to support muscle strength and energy
Concentrated Leuzea extract (95% beta-ecdysterone)
to support protein synthesis in the body
Great taste
Mixes very well

 

NO Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Tree Nuts, Fish, Shellfish, Wheat, Gluten, Yeast, Artificial sweeteners
Lactose FREE, Cholesterol FREE, Preservative FREE
LOW glycemic load
ONLY 110 Calories per every dose
NO Substances banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)

Special enzyme blend based on our solid professional experience to support maximum protein absorption * [1]

We have combined the best of our 20 years of experience in enzyme biotechnology, herbal extracts manufacturing, and dietary supplements development to create this unique vegan protein blend.*

This is a perfectly balanced formula designed to meet the highest requirements of every determined athlete.*

A plant based vegan protein which successfully rivals whey. [2]

How and Why It Works?

VemoHerb® VeganPro is the ideal choice for every athlete who wants to build and maintain muscle mass, through a safe and healthy diet.* [3, 4] It is one of the best plant-based alternatives to casein, whey, egg or meat protein.* [2]

VemoHerb® VeganPro contains pure protein from pea, rice and soy, and essential amino acids, including the branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), supporting muscle recovery and growth.* [4, 5, 6] VemoHerb® VeganPro also incorporates a proprietary enzyme blend, specifically developed to perfectly match the protein profile of this unique product, thus fully hydrolyzing and leading to complete digestion of every single amino acid from this special vegan protein.* [1, 4]

On the top of it all, it also contains 200 mg concentrated extract from Leuzea carthamoides (95% beta-ecdysterone) per each serving. It is a well-known fact that the Ecdysterone contained in the plant Leuzea carthamoides supports protein synthesis in the body.* [7, 8]

All of the above makes this unique formula the perfect choice for every determined athlete no matter if they are professionals or sport is just a part of their healthy lifestyle attitude.* [4, 6, 9]

Following a vegan diet may be the healthiest lifestyle choice you can make nowadays. However, it is crucial to ensure that you are taking enough protein, which is essential for the normal body functions. In the past it was very hard to maintain a vegan diet if you wanted to build substantial muscle mass. It was difficult to get all the necessary protein through the diet alone and unfortunately all offered proteins were not vegan friendly. Happily, with VemoHerb® VeganPro, following a healthy vegan lifestyle will no longer be a compromise for your perfect bodybuilding shape.* [2, 4, 6, 9]

No matter if you are a vegetarian or vegan, or you just want to supplement your diet with a healthier source of protein and let the meat, milk and egg proteins be consumed only with your gourmet meals, VemoHerb® VeganPro is the best choice to gain pure muscle mass.* [2, 4, 6, 9]

VemoHerb® VeganPro is developed to contain almost no carbohydrates. This means very little gut fermentation and fewer undesirable symptoms (gas, bloating) connected with plant based diets.

The pack contains

900 g powder

Active substances in one dose (30 g):

24 g protein blend (pea, rice, soy protein),
200 mg dry extract from Leuzea carthamoides (95 % ecdysterone),
5 mg dry extract from Piper nigrum,
600 mg L-leucine,
300 mg L-isoleucine,
300 mg L-valine,
1000 mg L-glutamine,
50 000 HUT protease,
15 000 SKB amylase,
10000 FIP Lipase

Flavour

Salty/Mocha/Vanilla

Recommended daily dose

Take 1-2 times a day

Directions for use

Mix 2 scoops (30 g) with 200 ml water.

Take between the meals or as directed on the label.

The product is a food supplement not a medical drug. The product is not a substitute for a varied diet. Do not exceed the recommended daily dose. It is not recommended for pregnant, nursing women and children!

References:

1. Gorelick-Feldman J, Maclean D, Ilic N, Poulev A, Lila MA, Cheng D, Raskin I. – Phytoecdysteroids increase protein synthesis in skeletal muscle cells.

Phytoecdysteroids, which are structurally similar or identical to insect molting hormones, produce a range of effects in mammals, including increasing growth and physical performance. To study the mechanism of action of phytoecdysteroids in mammalian tissue, an in vitro cellular assay of protein synthesis was developed. In C2C12 murine myotubes and human primary myotubes, phytoecdysteroids increased protein synthesis by up to 20%. In vivo, ecdysteroids increased rat grip strength. Ecdysteroid-containing plant extracts produced similar results. The effect was inhibited by a phosphoinositide kinase-3 inhibitor, which suggests a PI3K-mediated mechanism.

Read more

2. Campbell B, Kreider RB, Ziegenfuss T, La Bounty P, Roberts M, Burke D, Landis J, Lopez H, Antonio J. – International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: protein and exercise.

The following seven points related to the intake of protein for healthy, exercising individuals constitute the position stand of the Society. They have been approved by the Research Committee of the Society. 1) Vast research supports the contention that individuals engaged in regular exercise training require more dietary protein than sedentary individuals. 2) Protein intakes of 1.4 – 2.0 g/kg/day for physically active individuals is not only safe, but may improve the training adaptations to exercise training. 3) When part of a balanced, nutrient-dense diet, protein intakes at this level are not detrimental to kidney function or bone metabolism in healthy, active persons. 4) While it is possible for physically active individuals to obtain their daily protein requirements through a varied, regular diet, supplemental protein in various forms are a practical way of ensuring adequate and quality protein intake for athletes. 5) Different types and quality of protein can affect amino acid bioavailability following protein supplementation. The superiority of one protein type over another in terms of optimizing recovery and/or training adaptations remains to be convincingly demonstrated. 6) Appropriately timed protein intake is an important component of an overall exercise training program, essential for proper recovery, immune function, and the growth and maintenance of lean body mass. 7) Under certain circumstances, specific amino acid supplements, such as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA’s), may improve exercise performance and recovery from exercise.

Read more

3. Stark, M., Lukaszuk, J., Prawitz, A. and Salacinski, A. – Protein timing and its effects on muscular hypertrophy and strength in individuals engaged in weight-training. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (2012) 9: 54.

The purpose of this review was to determine whether past research provides conclusive evidence about the effects of type and timing of ingestion of specific sources of protein by those engaged in resistance weight training. Two essential, nutrition-related, tenets need to be followed by weightlifters to maximize muscle hypertrophy: the consumption of 1.2-2.0 g protein.kg -1 of body weight, and ≥44-50 kcal.kg-1 of body weight. Researchers have tested the effects of timing of protein supplement ingestion on various physical changes in weightlifters. In general, protein supplementation pre- and post-workout increases physical performance, training session recovery, lean body mass, muscle hypertrophy, and strength. Specific gains, differ however based on protein type and amounts. Studies on timing of consumption of milk have indicated that fat-free milk post-workout was effective in promoting increases in lean body mass, strength, muscle hypertrophy and decreases in body fat. The leucine content of a protein source has an impact on protein synthesis, and affects muscle hypertrophy. Consumption of 3-4 g of leucine is needed to promote maximum protein synthesis. An ideal supplement following resistance exercise should contain whey protein that provides at least 3 g of leucine per serving. A combination of a fast-acting carbohydrate source such as maltodextrin or glucose should be consumed with the protein source, as leucine cannot modulate protein synthesis as effectively without the presence of insulin. Such a supplement post-workout would be most effective in increasing muscle protein synthesis, resulting in greater muscle hypertrophy and strength. In contrast, the consumption of essential amino acids and dextrose appears to be most effective at evoking protein synthesis prior to rather than following resistance exercise. To further enhance muscle hypertrophy and strength, a resistance weight- training program of at least 10-12 weeks with compound movements for both upper and lower body exercises should be followed.

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4. Nahid Tamanna and NiazMahmood – Emerging Roles of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation in Human Diseases

The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), namely, valine, leucine, and isoleucine, are indispensable amino acids required for body protein synthesis. Unlike other amino acids, the BCAAs are primarily catabolised in the extrahepatic tissues. The BCAAs play role in regulation of protein synthesis and turnover as well as maintenance of the body glutamate-glutamine level. In strenuous and traumatic conditions, the BCAAs are oxidized which limits their availability in tissues. Such condition affects the body glutamate-glutamine pool and protein synthesis mechanisms. Thus BCCA supplementation is emerging as a nutritional strategy for treating many diseases. Many studies have found that BCAA administration is able to improve the health status of the patients suffering from different diseases even though there are conditions where they do not exert any effect. There are also some reports where elevated BCAAs have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of diseases. In this review, we have discussed the implication of BCAA supplementation in different pathological conditions and their relevant outcomes.

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5. Reidy, P. and Rasmussen, B. – Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise–Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism1–3. The Journal of Nutrition (2016). 146: 155.

The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose-dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor on this effect during long-term exercise interventions. There were no differences in strength or mass/muscle mass on RET outcomes between protein types when a leucine threshold (>2 g/dose) was reached. Future research with larger sample sizes and more homogeneity in design is necessary to understand the underlying adaptations and to better evaluate the individual variability in the muscle-adaptive response to protein/AA supplementation during RET.

Read more

6. Campbell, B., Kreider, R., Ziegenfuss, T., La Bounty, P., Roberts, M., Burke, D., Landis, J., Lopez, H. and Antonio, J. – International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: protein and exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (2007) 4: 8.

The following seven points related to the intake of protein for healthy, exercising individuals constitute the position stand of the Society. They have been approved by the Research Committee of the Society. 1) Vast research supports the contention that individuals engaged in regular exercise training require more dietary protein than sedentary individuals. 2) Protein intakes of 1.4 – 2.0 g/kg/day for physically active individuals is not only safe, but may improve the training adaptations to exercise training. 3) When part of a balanced, nutrient-dense diet, protein intakes at this level are not detrimental to kidney function or bone metabolism in healthy, active persons. 4) While it is possible for physically active individuals to obtain their daily protein requirements through a varied, regular diet, supplemental protein in various forms are a practical way of ensuring adequate and quality protein intake for athletes. 5) Different types and quality of protein can affect amino acid bioavailability following protein supplementation. The superiority of one protein type over another in terms of optimizing recovery and/or training adaptations remains to be convincingly demonstrated. 6) Appropriately timed protein intake is an important component of an overall exercise training program, essential for proper recovery, immune function, and the growth and maintenance of lean body mass. 7) Under certain circumstances, specific amino acid supplements, such as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA’s), may improve exercise performance and recovery from exercise.

Read more

7. Gorelick-Feldman, J., MacLean, D., Ilic, N., Poulev, A., Lila, M., Cheng, D. and Raskin, I. – Phytoecdysteroids Increase Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle Cells. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2008) 56: 3532.

Phytoecdysteroids, which are structurally similar or identical to insect molting hormones, produce a range of effects in mammals, including increasing growth and physical performance. To study the mechanism of action of phytoecdysteroids in mammalian tissue, an in vitro cellular assay of protein synthesis was developed. In C2C12 murine myotubes and human primary myotubes, phytoecdysteroids increased protein synthesis by up to 20%. In vivo, ecdysteroids increased rat grip strength. Ecdysteroid-containing plant extracts produced similar results. The effect was inhibited by a phosphoinositide kinase-3 inhibitor, which suggests a PI3K-mediated mechanism.

Read more

8. Toth, Noemi; Szabo, Andras; Kacsala, Peter; Heger, Julia; Zador, Erno – 20Hydroxyecdysone increases fiber size in a musclespecific fashion in rat.

20Hydroxyecdysone (20E) is an ecdysteroid hormone that regulates moulting in insects. Interestingly, 20E is also found most abundantly in plant species and has anabolic effects in vertebrates, i.e. increasing muscle size without androgen influence. The effect of 20E on slow and fast fiber types of skeletal muscle has not been reported yet. Here we present that 20E affects the size (crosssectional area, CSA) of the different fiber types in a musclespecific manner. The effect on fiber size was modified by the distance from the site of the treatment and the presence of a regenerating soleus muscle in the animal. Besides the fiber size, 20E also increased the myonuclear number in the fibers of normal and regenerating muscles, suggesting the activation of satellite cells. According to our results 20E may provide an alternative for substitution of anabolicandrogenic steroids in therapeutic treatments against muscle atrophy.

Read more

9. Helms, E., Aragon, A. and Fitschen, P. – Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (2014) 11: 20.

The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming 2.3-3.1 g/kg of lean body mass per day of protein, 15-30% of calories from fat, and the reminder of calories from carbohydrate. Eating three to six meals per day with a meal containing 0.4-0.5 g/kg bodyweight of protein prior and subsequent to resistance training likely maximizes any theoretical benefits of nutrient timing and frequency. However, alterations in nutrient timing and frequency appear to have little effect on fat loss or lean mass retention. Among popular supplements, creatine monohydrate, caffeine and beta-alanine appear to have beneficial effects relevant to contest preparation, however others do not or warrant further study. The practice of dehydration and electrolyte manipulation in the final days and hours prior to competition can be dangerous, and may not improve appearance. Increasing carbohydrate intake at the end of preparation has a theoretical rationale to improve appearance, however it is understudied. Thus, if carbohydrate loading is pursued it should be practiced prior to competition and its benefit assessed individually. Finally, competitors should be aware of the increased risk of developing eating and body image disorders in aesthetic sport and therefore should have access to the appropriate mental health professionals.

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*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 

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Additional information

Flavors

Mocha, Salty, Vanilla

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